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Work Skill Assessment (Chart 3)

Transition Planning Assessment AreasWhat are we AssessingHow can you assess it and how can you access the suggested data collection or assessment sources?
Cell 6: Basic Skills for Postsecondary ExpectationsCore workplace skills Review student files or portfolios to see if information related to workplace skills (e.g., job seeking, job keeping, claiming disability rights/accommodations, etc.) has been documented from any previous assessment effort. Check student transcripts for subject area strengths that could generalize to a workplace, district wide academic assessment results, and any observations by general or special education teachers relative to student work habits and skills that might be helpful in planning.
Complete (or review) a work history record on the student to establish previous work experience and the tasks performed or skills demonstrated.
Conduct classroom observations in selected classes to obtain information on generalizable workplace skills (e.g., completing assigned tasks, careful use of materials, following directions, punctuality, attendance, response to criticism or correction, etc.) or interview general and special education teachers for their observations in these areas.
Conduct formal or informal observations on students with no work history in a job or occupational exploration experience at school or in the community. Document observations related to student behaviors indicating skills and work habits, using a form such as Job Site Interest Summary.
Conduct worksite observations of students in current work situations. Document observations of work skills and habits. Consider using the Work Habit Observation form.
Collect and review employer worksite evaluations of students currently in work situations.

Two examples of employer worksite evaluation forms are: Worksite Evaluation Form and Employee Evaluation Form.
Interview current and/or previous employers to elicit their evaluations of the student’s demonstrated skills, work attitudes and habits, and supervision response patterns
Administer informal checklist assessment of competencies related to postsecondary work success using the Comprehensive Inventory of Transition Knowledge and Skills, Items 3-5 on pp. 11-14 of Informal Assessments for Transition Planning (IATP). These checklists address job seeking, job keeping, and specific occupational skills.

IATP (Clark, Patton, & Moulton, 2000) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Complete the Citizenship and Legal Skills rating scale from Independent Living and Community Participation: Informal Assessments for Transition, p. 36

ILCP (Synatschk, Clark, & Patton, 2008) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Administer informal checklist assessment of competencies related to knowledge of legal rights, especially under ADA, using the Comprehensive Inventory of Transition Knowledge and Skills, Item 20 on pp. 24-25 of Informal Assessments for Transition Planning (IATP). This checklist addresses legal rights and responsibilities, as well as ADA rights.

IATP (Clark, Patton, & Moulton, 2000) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Administer the Career Portfolio rating scale from Informal Assessments for Transition Planning (IATP), p. 63. This 5-point rating scale is an informal teacher or employer assessment that covers a variety of job seeking and job keeping skills/habits/attitudes.

IATP (Clark, Patton, & Moulton, 2000) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Administer Skills Identification checklist from Employment and Career Planning: Informal Assessments for Transition (ECP-IAT), p. 61. This checklist is an informal self-assessment that covers a variety of job skills/habits/attitudes.

ECP-IAT (Synatschk, Clark, Patton, & Copeland, 2007) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Administer selected employability skills tests as needed to assist the student in the career decision-making and planning process. Examples of commercially available instruments include the following (alphabetical order):
  • AccuVision™ Workplace Success Skills System. The AccuVision Workplace Success Skills System assesses the following skills: Interacting With Others (behaviors associated with facilitation, influencing others, commitment to quality, customer service orientation and problem solving); Listening (understanding factual information and implied meanings presented orally); Trainability (absorbing and applying new information); Structuring Work Activities (organizing work activities for self or others to facilitate task accomplishment), and Graphs & Charts (extracting and interpreting information presented in a graph or chart format). This system is available at http://www.resourceconnection.com/accuvision-wss.html
  • BRIGANCE® Employability Skills Inventory. This inventory has over 1,400 items across multiple work skill areas. Select appropriate skills tests or informal assessments in work habits and attitudes. Available at www.curriculumassociates.com
  • Life Centered Career Education Knowledge & Performance Batteries. The LCCE batteries are associated with the Life Centered Career Education Curriculum as curriculum-based assessments but may be used independently. The Occupational component of the batteries should be used. The knowledge battery is multiple-choice items requiring knowledge of job seeking and job keeping. The performance battery has concrete and applied problems addressing the same areas. Available at CEC Store link at http://www.cec.sped.org
  • Wonderlic Basic Skills Test (WBST). The WBST is designed to measure basic abilities in verbal and mathematical areas. This test is generally applied on adults for the entry level jobs. It can be completed quickly within a shorter period of time. The Wonderlic Basic Skills Test results provide critical data to measure skill level, cognitive capabilities and future performance. The scores also suggest capabilities to use verbal and math skills in real world working situations. Available at http://www.personality-and-aptitude-career-tests.com/wonderlic-basic-skills-test.html
  • Work Adjustment Inventory (WAI). The WAI is a norm-referenced instrument, assesses work-related temperament. The WAI can be used in the development of individual transition plans for students with disabilities and has application for at-risk students. Six scales measure six work-related temperament traits: Activity, Empathy, Sociability, Assertiveness, Adaptability, and Emotionality. Utilizing a self-report format, the WAI is designed for use with persons ages 12 to 22 years who are just beginning to work, and can be administered to individuals or groups in approximately 20 minutes. Test items are written at a third-grade reading level and the examiner may read the items to the students. Available at www.proedinc.com